Siding Contractors Beatrice NE

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Siding Contractors. You will find informative articles about Siding Contractors, including "The Best Materials for Home Siding". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Beatrice, NE that can help answer your questions about Siding Contractors.

Beatrice Concrete Company Inc - Corporate
(402) 223-4289
400 Scott Street
Beatrice, NE
 
Groundskeeper Ryan Kieny
(402) 451-4700
4730 State Circle
Omaha, NE
 
Twin River Valley Irrigation
(308) 773-2177
208 West Highway 30
Silver Creek, NE
 
Turfbuilders Irrigation Inc
(402) 592-7100
11364 South 147th Street
Omaha, NE
 
Bobcat of Omaha
(402) 595-6660
9317 S. 144th
Omaha, NE
 
Turf Specialists
(402) 895-1855
18615 F Street
Omaha, NE
 
Earl May Nursery & Garden Center
(402) 462-6576
2220 North Kansas Avenue
Hastings, NE
 
Beckenhauer Landscaping
(402) 453-6307
4594 Caley Avenue
Omaha, NE
 
Greenkeeper Grounds Maintenance CO
(402) 560-4959
22959 South 1st Road
Beatrice, NE
 
Certified Siding Professionals
2318 South 114th Street
Omaha, NE
Services
Specialty Contractor, Remodeler
Membership Organizations
Better Business Bureau, Certified Contractors Network (CCN), James Hardie Preferred Remodeler

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The Best Materials for Home Siding

Just like those old commercials for Virginia Slims, siding has come a long way, baby. It used to be a drab and poor excuse for an outdoor re-model. We often associate siding with trailers and trailer parks. But those are distant memories in the evolution of siding. Let's step into the new age of siding.
 
Today, siding comes in many different styles and materials.  Here's a quick list:
Aluminum Siding
Aluminum rose to prominence after World War II. However, the color can fade and, unlike vinyl siding, it can be dented. Dented siding is not a pretty sight. Depending on the climate, it can also expand and contract. However, it can be painted easily. Oil-based paint is the clear choice over latex.
Vinyl Siding
The reigning champ of siding, vinyl siding is made of PVC or polyvinyl chloride and comes in a wide variety of colors. Gone are the days of gray, white and beige as the color defaults for vinyl. You install the panels from the bottom row up by using galvanized roofing nails and punching them through the slots in the panel. Keeping the nail head exposed so the panels can move is key. Vinyl expands even more than aluminum and contracts in hot and cold weather so it has to slide freely from side to side. The key to vinyl’s dominance in the marketplace? It is inexpensive and never needs painting.
 
 
 
Wood Siding
Not as popular as vinyl or aluminum, wood siding comes in a variety of styles/types such as shake, clapboard, singles or lap. The panels can be applied vertically or horizontally, and finishes range from stains to paint to sealants. It should be installed over a moisture barrier. Many contractors recommend that you prime the back of the wood and its sides to prevent water from seeping into the wood. Its beautiful, but can be a real hassle to maintain. If you're not fastidious detail type, then stick to vinyl or aluminum.
Log Siding
Yep, they even have log siding. Want that log cabin look without actually building a log cabin? Look no further. Log siding comes in quarter logs and half logs. It’s so sophisticated that you can get a smooth or a knotty finish. Some log siding isn't even wood, however it does resemble wood and it’s available in vinyl or get this, steel. The most common wood choices for log siding are pine or cedar.
 
Composite Siding
Composite siding is the closest you'll get in "green" siding. It can be created from almost any material and it’s usually crafted to look like natural woods. Some composite siding is made from shredded wood, binders, glue and Portland cement. Habitat for Humanity builds many homes with HardiBoard, a form of composite siding.
 
 
 
 

Glass Block Exteriors
Believe it or not, glass block walls are non-load bearing and they fall under the siding moniker. They're laid by installing panel anchors to the jambs, ex...

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